Craig Dunn will be teaching Geothermal Energy at Westmount Charter School

Westmount-Charter-School-logo-design

Westmount Charter School
Geothermal Energy/Renewable
The People for Energy & Environmental Literacy (PEEL) Program
March 15, 2016, Tuesday @ 8:50 am to 10:00 am

Craig Dunn will present Geothermal Energy to the Grade 4 class of Westmount Charter School PEEL program. A literacy program that empowers students to understand the environmental, social and economic challenges and opportunities around energy consumption, climate change and sustainability. With the support of over 25 energy-sector organizations, PEEL has inspired students and parents to evaluate their energy usage through environmental initiatives such as an EcoFair, weekly nature field trips, letter writing campaigns, home and school audits, a “turn me off” campaign, and various art and math activities. Students are learning the power of their voices, the impacts of their choices and the need for continued and immediate change concerning the environment.

The Volcanic Underground: Is Geothermal Energy The Answer?

Alberta, B.C. and Saskatchewan are sitting on a wealth of free, green energy. So why is nobody doing anything about it?

“We are already in the top – maybe the top five – producers of geothermal energy in the world.”

Strange words when you consider that Alberta has never produced a megawatt of geothermal. Alison Thompson, co-founder of the Canadian Geothermal Energy Association (CANGEA), sounds exasperated trying to explain the fact. “We are producing the energy, we’re just not doing anything with it,” she says. “It’s like a nuclear plant or a coal plant spinning the electrical generator but you didn’t connect it to the grid.”

“We don’t have a geothermal industry in Alberta for the most part,” says Craig Dunn, chief geologist of Calgary-based Borealis GeoPower, all of whose projects are outside of Alberta. “We have people in the industry who are excited and opportunistic about what could be, but we are currently at zero megawatts of production.”

The potential is there. Canada’s west coast exists within the Pacific Ocean’s Ring of Fire, making it a hotbed of geothermal activity. While Canada doesn’t see the earthquakes or volcanic activity of many other Ring of Fire countries, a 2010 study in the peer-reviewed Journal of Geophysics and Geoengineering shows the abundant potential for geothermal. It found the most promising sites in Alberta, B.C. and Saskatchewan, at depths of between 3.5 and 6.5 kilometres (not deep by modern drilling standards). But unlike other Ring of Fire countries like the U.S., the Philippines, and Mexico, Canada has not developed much geothermal.

But with a new government and the prospect of long-term low oil prices, Alberta has never seen a greater opportunity for a geothermal industry to get off the ground.

Alberta’s poor performance in geothermal is especially surprising when you consider the technology and engineering know-how that exists in this province. “Given that we have tens of thousands of wells and then tens of thousands more that have been abandoned or suspended, this is an enormous resource that we’ve already managed in Alberta, and that’s a surprise for a lot of people,” Thompson says. “The real message here is the silver lining. You go looking for oil, and you get some silver along the way.”

Dunn says that technologically, Canada is among the best in the world for both drilling and resource exploration. In his mind, there is no excuse for not being ahead of the countries that are producing geothermal.

Both Dunn and Thompson say a major reason behind this stagnation is a simple lack of interest. For years, geothermal has existed under the radar of both the oil and gas giants and the provincial government. When oil was at $100 a barrel it was hard to get producers to discuss geothermal. And when the only way to develop geothermal is to partner with the oil and gas industry, you have a stalemate. “Why are we not doing it is because no one cared,” Thompson says. “No one cared before about being a bit more green or they didn’t care about maybe getting another quarter of a million dollars in revenue off that wellhead with oil prices over $100.”

That’s no longer the case. Now, geothermal may start blinking on the radar of the oil and gas industry because, while the short-term benefits may be less than those of oil and gas, in the long run it can help a company’s bottom line. “The advantage is that you’re building an infrastructure for a renewable resource that can run indefinitely,” Dunn says.

And one can see the benefits of geothermal for Albertan workers. They would put drillers and engineers back to work in the energy industry, and put the keys back into equipment that is now sitting cold and dormant.

One of the hurdles the industry needs to overcome is a lack of provincial policy surrounding geothermal. For instance, right now you can’t get a permit just to develop a geothermal resource. It has to be part of another resource-development permit. Thompson is hopeful there will be some movement in that regard. She points out that CANGEA never got a meeting during the years of Progressive Conservative rule in this province, but within months of the NDP taking over, she has organized a meeting with Energy Minister Margaret McCuaig-Boyd.

“This is a type of warmer welcome that we’re getting,” she says. “We’re not looking at future pie-in-the-sky, but at what can we do today to make tomorrow different.” Both Dunn and Thompson are adamant that geothermal can and will work hand in hand with the core of Alberta’s energy industry. The relationship would be a symbiotic one, with geothermal supplementing oil and gas.

“This is not about shutting [the oil patch] down, this is about extending it and making it, right at the wellhead, more green,” Thompson says. “Get more use out of your footprint. You’ve disturbed the land, let’s get micro power and oil and gas out of it.”
There are projects on the horizon that offer promise to the geothermal industry.

One initiative is underway near Hinton, in the rolling foothills east of Jasper. Researchers from the University of Alberta have teamed up with Alberta Innovates – Energy and Environment Solutions and the towns in the region to study the development of 10 geothermal reservoirs. Advocates hope that proving to industry and the new government that it is possible to extract geothermal will jumpstart the industry. “We need to start using what we have and not pitting environmental movement against oil and gas,” Thompson says. “We’re all in this together, and we can all work together to make energy more sustainable and more green without shutting people down.”

Click here to view the article…

Energized: Alternative Heat Source

Energized Crops Being Fuelled by Alternative Heat Sources
By Treena Hein

From geothermal and solar and landfill gas, and from composting and working with neighbors.
Craig Dunn, Chief Geologist of Borealis Geopower has been featured in Greenhouse Canada magazine, August 2015 issue.

Click here to view the full publication.


The landscape of greenhouse heating is changing in Canada as we speak. There are now a small but significant number of greenhouses across the country being heated in ways only imagined decades ago – or not imagined at all.

And if people like Craig Dunn, chief geologist at Borealis Geopower od Calgary, have anything to say about it, there will be many more greehouses in Canada using alternative sources of energy.

Dunn notes that geothermal is a cost – effective way of producing power as well as heat, and that there is great geothermal potential in Canada.

“The basic idea behind direct heating is to tap into a moderate heat source (40 to 60 C), be it directly from the ground or as a byproduct of a power plant, and bring that heat to the surface in the form of hot water,” Dunn explains.

“The temperature of the source water being used only needs to be 10 or 20 degrees hotter that the design temperature of the building.”

He notes that in areas where there is a higher – than – average heat gradient, only moderate drilling is needed to produce these results.

“Given that drilling costs are easily the largest expense in any geothermal project, providing heat for a greenhouse that supplies local food markets makes geothermal projects more viable all around.”

 

Craig Dunn to present Feeding and Fuelling the Local Economy with Leor Rotchild

Craig Dunn to present Feeding and Fuelling the Local Economy with Leor Rotchild

Feeding and Fuelling the Local Economy
Corporate Responsibility

October 2, 2015
6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
Sheep River Library
Black Diamond/Turner Valley
Cost: $15 ($4.50 after tax credit)
Register Here

collageLeor has worked within the energy industry for seven years as a Corporate Social Responsibility Advisor. Previous to this, he worked in the international development sector with a non-profit water organization. He was the Eco-Initiatives Manager for the Calgary Folk Festival for five years and now sits on the festival’s Board of Directors. He is also a co-organizer of TEDxYYC and holds a B.Comm. from Ryerson University.

In 2012, Leor was recognized as a Top 40 Under 40 by Avenue Magazine and a Compelling Calgarian by the Calgary Herald. In 2011, he received the YMCA Peace Medal for Humanitarianism.

Alison met Leor almost a decade ago when they both worked at Nexen. They connected over the importance of corporate social responsibility. They know first hand how gaining a social license for oil, gas and renewable energy projects is the only way, in this new economy, to get our natural resources to markets.

Craig Dunn joins the campaign’s evening discussion series again. He’ll discuss how to increase profitability of existing oil & gas wells and re-purpose Foothills abandoned and suspended wells to make them into community centre-pieces that can feed and fuel the local economy.

Come and learn more about how to unlock Alberta’s and Canada’s wealth!

Solar, Wind and Geothermal evening of discussion

Solar, Wind and Geothermal evening of discussion

Are you curious about how renewable energy can contribute to the economy, create jobs and protect our environment? (Not to mention be built right here in Foothills?) Join Alison and other renewable energy professionals for an evening of discussion.

Thursday, October 1 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m High River, AB
Foothills SNAPS
123 4th Ave SW
Cost: $15 ($4.50 after tax credit)

Register Here

About the presenters:

Paula McGarringle

Paula McGarrigle
Managing Director, SOLAS Energy Consulting Inc. 

Ms. McGarrigle has focused the majority of her twenty-year career on the deployment of renewable energy technology in North America. She is a leader in climate change and renewable energy policy within the Canadian renewable energy community, ENGOs, policy makers, and consultants. Her significant experience in project development, business development and organizational strategic planning within the Renewable Energy sector has resulted in developments totalling over 1,100 MW.

Ms. McGarrigle was formerly the head of Shell Canada’s Wind Energy Department, and Director of Business Development for Suncor Energy’s Alternative and Renewable Energy department. Prior to entering the Renewable Energy sector, she worked in the Oil, Gas, and Chemicals industries doing engineering, business and international consulting.

Ms. McGarrigle’s academic background includes two undergraduate degrees from the University of Alberta; Bachelor of Science in Biology and Chemistry and a Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering. Ms. McGarrigle also holds an MBA in Finance from Queen’s University.

The smell of money: Alison first met Paula almost 15 years ago when Paula hired her to work on an animal manure to biogas project feasibility study. Their energy careers have crossed paths many times since.

Craig DunnCraig Heatshot 2011
Chief Geologist, Borealis Geopower

Geologist, Entrepreneur, Energy fanatic and lover of earth, Craig Dunn is always on the go.  He is the co-founder of multiple organizations in a variety of fields, including geopower exploration, technology and social good; as a father of two, he is always thinking of the world that we are leaving for the next generation.  He lives by the idea that “Make beautiful ideas reality and the world will follow”.

After moving to Calgary and working in the environmental sector, Mr. Dunn got his first taste of what the energy industry was all about.  In 2003, Mr. Dunn founded WellDunn Consulting, a geological consulting firm for the oil and gas industry in both conventional and unconventional oil and gas exploration across the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin. Mr. Dunn was one of key personnel involved with the resurgence of the Canadian Geothermal Energy Association (CanGEA) on the board of directors and as the Outreach Director. His work has helped to establish CanGEA’s education program, helped to promote a national study for geothermal potential in Canada and co-authored many geothermal reports.

His work with CanGEA, led him to his role as founder and Chief Geologist with Borealis Geopower. He is considered one of the leading experts and pioneers in geothermal energy exploration and development initiatives in Canada. Mr. Dunn supplies both project management and geological expertise for the development of high temperature geothermal energy.  Borealis Geopower has multiple ongoing geothermal power projects across Western Canada working to bring the first Geopower projects online.

Hot Stuff: Alison has worked with Craig in the geothermal energy sector since 2007 when they connected over the need to bring awareness of this energy resource to the Canadian public and government. Both are frequent contributors to the national media and accomplished public speakers on the role of geothermal energy in the economy.

Click here to register.

Craig Dunn at Corporate Knights of the Round Table

Craig Dunn at Corporate Knights of the Round Table

Calgary Knights of the Round Table


Geothermal Power: Energy for the next generation

Presented by: Craig Dunn, P. Geo: Chief Geologist, Borealis Geopower
August 4, 2015 

Knights-Logo-v2Every Tuesday at noon a group of Calgary men and women meet for lunch, listen to a speech and dialogue with the speaker for 30 to 45 minutes. They are continuing a tradition that has operated without interruption since the Calgary Knights of the Round Table was founded in 1925.

It started as a branch of Round Table International, an American organization with which the local club was affiliated until the late l970s. The founding members were Alex Calhoun, A.B. McKay, Dr. G.D. Stanley, Eric Richardson and George Clarke, all prominent leaders of the community.

Their purpose was to provide a forum for speakers where honestly held opinions could be debated in an atmosphere of tolerance and congeniality.

More than 3,800 speakers have addressed the assembled members on a wide range of subjects that includes politics, history, art, literature, philosophy, science, economics, local and international affairs. The subjects may be mainstream or “far out” but are always topical.

When the speakers have concluded their remarks they are questioned by members. A speaker should not expect to make the presentation, acknowledge the applause and go home. A spirit of free inquiry inspires the debate that follows.

An editor at the Calgary Herald described the Knights as the “best kept secret in the city”.

In the beginning the membership was all male. Women were admitted as members in 1975. All who attend, including guests of members, are encouraged to participate in the discourse and to expand the spirit of intellectual companionship which permits free and open discussion.

There are a few rules other than those of good taste and good manners.

The life of the Table depends on the active contribution of every individual member and the fullest recognition that only by the cooperation of each individual member can the principals upon which the Table was founded be fully realized.

The “Knights”, unlike service clubs, abstain from participation in community undertakings. Members make their own individual choices and for that reason speakers are asked to refrain from solicitations. Membership at the Table adds a valuable dimension to the life of the “Knight”, food for the mind from the knowledge, wit and wisdom of the speakers and the debate. The weekly luncheon is an opportunity to expand one’s consciousness and awareness by opening the mind to the opinion of others.

Click here to view the original source..

“A Geothermal Resource Development opportunity for power” – Craig Dunn

“A Geothermal Resource Development opportunity for power” – Craig Dunn

CTVNEWS: Pilot project to transform oil industry waste water into geothermal energy.

Cimage-2ALGARY — In a few weeks a generator in North Dakota will fire up, powered by nothing more than waste water from an oil well.

The pilot project is designed to show that it’s possible to generate geothermal electricity from the boiling water that comes out of the wells.

The concept is something Alison Thompson, managing director of the Canadian Geothermal Energy Association, has long been calling for in Canada’s oilpatch.

“We’ve been advocating for many years to do what we’ll call the hot sedimentary-style geothermal, which is really no more than taking what the oil and gas companies are already producing and running it through a little turbine right at their site.”

Canada produces huge amounts of geothermal power, but so far none of it is being used to generate electricity, Thompson said.

“We just actually bring up all that potential to the surface and then do nothing with it. It’s actually treated as a waste or a cost to the company.”

She equates the waste to the gas flaring that was common across Alberta until stricter regulations came in to curb the practice in 2000. She says either higher carbon pricing or more regulation would encourage companies to try the technology, but there isn’t enough incentive now.

Will Gosnold, a researcher at the University of North Dakota who is leading the pilot project, said that during the shale boom in recent years no one was interested in fiddling with extra equipment, but with oil prices low, companies are looking at any way to save money.

“Now things have slowed down due to the price decrease and they’re looking at ways to cut costs, and this is one way they could cut their electrical power cost by generating their own electricity.”

The pilot project in North Dakota, which is being developed with energy company Continental Resources Inc., cost about US$3.5 million and includes several years of research and development. Gosnold said if the pilot project is successful, new geothermal units could be constructed at a cost of US$250,000 each.

The two generators on site have a combined 250 kilowatt hour capacity, which Gosnold estimates could mean about US$150,000 in annual energy cost savings in total. At 250 kwh, the generators would produce enough power to meet the annual needs of about 300 homes.

Gosnold hopes that once the pilot plant starts operating, other companies will see the economic and environmental benefits.

“We’re trying to get their attention, and we’re really hoping our demo project will do that,” said Gosnold.

Interest in the technology is picking up in Alberta since the NDP were elected, said Craig Dunn, chief geologist at Calgary-based Borealis Geopower.

“There’s more and more interest, especially when we’re talking about in Alberta the NDP government, opportunities for a new carbon regime — that’s driving a lot of people to ask these questions.”

Borealis Geopower tried to develop a similar project a few years ago but with a water temperature of 85 degrees Celsius, the project didn’t end up working, Dunn said.

He said while that initiative failed, there are many other oil wells in Western Canada that run hotter than 120 C, meaning they would have a better chance of succeeding.

“That is a geothermal resource development opportunity for power,” said Dunn.

Craig Dunn to present his experience as Geothermal Resource Developer this Friday, May 22nd.

Geothermal Resource Development & Canadian Business Opportunities

Calgary Petroleum Club
Friday, May 22, 2015
9:00AM – 11:30AM

Registration: $75
Member Price: $35

A similar event we held in Vancouver on March 26
SOLD OUT!

Register Here!

6 Spots Left!!

Geothermal energy is delivering clean, base-load and low cost electricity in 24 countries as well as heating in 70 countries for fish farms,greenhouses, breweries, and much more! While not yet fully utilized, geothermal energy is an important part of Canada’s energy future, creating new investment and jobs in Canadian communities while also contributing to a cleaner environment for future generations.

Join us to learn about Canadian Geothermal Opportunities and how you can enter into the geothermal market!

We are taking everything to the next level. This session will be presented in two parts:

1. Geothermal Resources Development. As a continuation of our Geothermal 101 series, Craig Dunn, chief geologist of Borealis GeoPower, will be presenting on his experience as a geothermal resource developer. There is a myriad of variables to worry about in today’s fossil fuel industry; volatile commodity pricing, access to market issues, carbon pricing and social license to name a few. Predicting what will make up profitable energy markets in 5, 10 or 30 years is becoming increasingly difficult. What if the next great energy project is not a fossil fuel project at all?

2. Canadian Business Opportunities. CanGEA’s chair, Alison Thompson will be providing an in depth overview of all of the geothermal heat and power projects currently taking place in Canada. She will explain what is expected moving forward and how you can get in on the action. With drilling anticipated to commence in British Columbia Saskatchewan and the Yukon Territory, things are really HEATING UP!

Only 18 spots available! You do NOT want to miss this!

What else is happening on May 22?
Keynote Luncheon Address “The Cost of Power from Fossil Fuels: A physician’s Perspective”
Technology Transfer Workshop between the Carbon Capture & Storage and Geothermal Industries

Borealis Geopower in Vancouver Sun article on BC’s geothermal energy potential

Borealis Geopower in Vancouver Sun article on BC’s geothermal energy potential

B.C geothermal advocates keeps heat on campaign to promote energy potential

Challenges include Site C Dam, which has put many alternatives on the back burner
By Derrick Penner, Vancouver Sun

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Calgary-based Borealis Geopower is aiming to build geothermal power plants at two British Columbia locations that it hopes will be churning out electricity from the heat of the earth by 2018, the company’s chief geologist said in Vancouver this week.

Notwithstanding that the province essentially put large-scale geothermal exploration in B.C. on the back burner, along with a lot of other independent power projects, with its decision to build BC Hydro’s $9-billion Site C dam project, Craig Dunn is optimistic about Borealis’s prospects to build small, 10-to-15 megawatt facilities at Canoe Reach near Valemount and Lakelse Lake near Terrace.

“The goal is to be able to show geothermal (power) is a viable option for the province of British Columbia,” Dunn said.

That is a message the Canadian Geothermal Energy Association (CanGEA) has been working diligently to spread since the conclusion of the Joint Review Panel on Site C, which gave special mention to geothermal potential in its concluding report.

While the report concluded that Site C was likely the best alternative for long-term secure power, the panelists were critical of BC Hydro over its limited study of geothermal as an option for generating power.

“Our objective is very simply to build awareness,” said CanGEA chairwoman Alison Thompson.

Last September, CanGEA released its most recent research, including more detailed maps of potential geothermal hot spots, that suggested B.C. could generate 5,500 megawatts of electricity — the equivalent of about 45 per cent of BC Hydro’s existing generating capacity.

It followed that in November with a full report, Thompson said, which CanGEA released in Victoria and followed up with a luncheon at the end of January to show off its results and a technical briefing for government, BC Hydro and the public at the start of February.

On Thursday, CanGEA brought Dunn as its key speaker to Vancouver for another boardroom lunch audience of 31, with an overflow presentation to another 15, to talk about the challenges and potential payoffs of geothermal-power development.

To date, it is mostly the challenges that have been at the forefront of development in B.C. Developers poured millions of dollars into geothermal exploration at Meager Creek north of Pemberton and tapped temperatures high enough to generate power, but couldn’t find the hot water that it needed to flow.

In it’s last integrated resource plan, BC Hydro identified potential for just 780 megawatts of geothermal power from 16 potential sites.

And in November, Energy and Mines Minister Bill Bennett said B.C. is still a long way from having usable geothermal power, because the market has “been slow to pick it up.”

Statements like that, Thompson said, are misinformation. She said the province also needs to do more to enable geothermal exploration by approving more of the applications for subsurface exploration rights that geothermal developers have been making.

Thompson said she is aware of about 100 such applications that have been made to the province where decisions are still pending.

The geothermal sector is challenged by the long time frames and high upfront capital costs that go into exploration and development of resources, but they are long-term, stable cash generators once they are developed.

“(That) is great for pension funds,” Dunn said, but it makes it difficult to raise capital in the energy sector.

“Geothermal is my energy superhero,” said Dunn, who formerly worked in the oilpatch. “It’s clean (and) renewable. It’s baseload power you can give your kids.”

In B.C., Dunn said zones along the slopes of the Rocky Mountains are attractive areas for exploration, as are the sedimentary basins of the province’s heavily drilled natural gas fields where a lot is already known about subsurface temperatures and potential.

CanGEA’s goal now is to “leave everyone with the impression that this is doable,” Thompson said.

Encore YVR Event! Our Geothermal Lunch & Learn has SOLD out!

Encore YVR Event! Our Geothermal Lunch & Learn has SOLD out!

Turn Up the Heat  BC: Coffee Break  – A developer’s perspective

“60% of California’s North Coast is powered by geothermal energy” 
– USDOE

Geothermal energy is delivering clean, base-load and low cost electricity in 25 countries as well as commercial heating in 70 countries… And we think BC should be benefitting too! While not yet fully utilized, geothermal energy is an important part of Canada’s energy future, creating new investment and jobs in Canadian communities while also contributing to a cleaner environment for future generations.

Join Chief Geologist of Borealis GeoPower, Craig Dunn, as we explore the Canadian energy industry’s efforts to develop geothermal energy. Craig will discuss his company’s ground-breaking field work completed this past summer that proved new exploration techniques from other industries to be valuable. Anders Kruus, a financial specialist will also be presenting.

Borealis GeoPower received an investment of $2.4 million from Sustainable Development Technology Canada towards its Optimized Geothermal Exploration Project.

“Borealis GeoPower’s optimized geothermal exploration methodology is a carefully ordered set of processes and technologies that builds up an increasingly accurate picture of a geothermal resource, allowing the drilling of production wells precisely where they have the highest probability of hitting commercially-viable amounts of hot water. The program involves cutting-edge exploration techniques and innovative sub-surfacing reservoir modelling to help reduce the overall risk associated with exploration drilling.” – Borealis GeoPower, 2015

British Columbia deserves a clean, emissions-free energy source. You may be unaware of the new information about the feasibility of geothermal power and the capabilities of Canadian developers and service providers. But, we want to let you know how technology transfer opportunities have changed the game and made geothermal projects more favourable than ever!

Craig Dunn_Corp.HeadshotAbout the Presenter:

craig@borealisgeopower.com
@loveyourrock
Geologist, Entrepreneur, Energy fanatic and lover of earth, Craig Dunn is always on the go. He is the co-founder of multiple organizations in a variety of fields, including geopower exploration, technology and social good; as a father of two, he is always thinking of the world that we are leaving for the next generation. He lives by the idea that “Make beautiful ideas reality and the world will follow”.

After moving to Calgary and working in the environmental sector, Mr. Dunn got his first taste of what the energy industry was all about. In 2003, Mr. Dunn founded WellDunn Consulting, a geological consulting firm for the oil and gas industry in both conventional and unconventional oil and gas exploration across the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin. Always pursuing the cutting edge projects, Mr. Dunn worked on many early stage programs from the Bakken in SE Saskatchewan to tight gas plays in NE BC. With a passion for renewable energy, he moved on to work multiple geothermal exploration projects in the US and Canada with some of the first public geothermal companies in Canada.

Mr. Dunn was one of key personnel involved with the resurgence of the Canadian Geothermal Energy Association (CanGEA) on the board of directors and as the Outreach Director. His work has helped to establish CanGEA’s education program, helped to promote a national study for geothermal potential in Canada and co-authored many geothermal reports including Geothermal Policy Best Practices (2009). His work with CanGEA, led him to his role as founder and Chief Geologist with Borealis Geopower. He is considered one of the leading experts and pioneers in geothermal energy exploration and development initiatives in Canada. Mr. Dunn supplies both project management and geological expertise for the development of high temperature geothermal energy. Borealis Geopower has multiple ongoing geothermal power projects across Western Canada working to bring the first Geopower projects online.

Anders Kruus, MBA, CMA:
Anders will be presenting on his financing experience with Canadian geothermal developing companies DEEP, Alterra Power Corp. and Borealis GeoPower.

Mr. Kruus is a versatile finance professional with more than 20 years of leadership success in corporate finance, investor relations, sales and capital markets. Capital & cash flow-driven, with experience and talents that have repeatedly produced strong results through business planning, process improvement, positive team leadership, leveraging of technology and innovative deal structuring.

He received his MBA from the University of Toronto after completing his degree in Economics and Political Science from Carleton University. Mr. Kruus has industry experience in banking & investments, renewable energy, commercial & residential real estate, and SaaS startups.

For more information about this event. Click here.